Land Rover (Buick) engine parts

suntreemcanic

Active Member
I am working on 2000 Land Rover with a 240 CI aluminum engine. Is that a Buick motor that has been enlarged from 215 CI? Does rocker arm parts from a 215 interchange with the 240 such as plugs in the ends of the rocker arm shaft? Land Rover parts are hard to find and expensive. Buick parts are easier to get if they will work. If anyone knows anything about this do not be bashful chime in!
 
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PM Jim Blackwood over on V8buick. He is very knowledgeable about the 215-300-340 engines. He would know the answer to that question.
 
I would call TA Performance. They make Rover heads that will bolt on to the 300/340 with some modifications. In the catalog, they say that the early valve train parts are not compatible with the TA heads, so I am not sure about your engine.

TARoverHeads.jpg
 

suntreemcanic

Active Member
Well I have another problem I just found. One of the liners is protruding up .009 inch. I will have to research what that means.
 

CJ

Member
Suntreemcanic asked: "Is that a Buick motor that has been enlarged from 215 CI?"

Yes and no; If original to the vehicle you have the Grandson of the 215. Rover produced the 215 (3.5 Liter) for several years and then proceed to make a 3.9L, a 4.0L, a 4.2L and a 4.6L.

Lets assume you have a 2000 Land Rover Discovery II with the original aluminum V-8 motor. If so the following applies:
2000 Land Rover Discovery II came with the 4.0L engine. Notice 4.0L is a marketing label, the real engine displacement is 3.947L which is 240.7 Cubic inches.

A cylinder sleeve that has moved is common for these engines. If this is what happened in your case then you are in for some expensive repair work. The block has to be notched to accept tophat liners. As with anything else there is a learning curve on how to repair a Rover engine.
I would start by reading: "How to Power Tune Rover V8 Engines for Road & Track " by Des Hammill, ISBN-13: ‎ 978-1787111769. Amazon still has a few copies. Understanding this engines strengths and weaknesses and what to do about them will help you move forward.

for a short history of this engine: https://www.thewedgeshop.com/rover-v81.html
(notice: they also have heads)

CJ
 
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suntreemcanic

Active Member
I have been doing some research about these engines, the original Buick engine was probably OK for it"s time. But the British engineers should have thrown it away along time ago. I am going to push the liner back where it belongs and then drill holes in the block and into the liner to hold it in place. My expenses are parts and I can do my own work. I will not be installing liners with a top lip that requires machine work on the top of the block. If after all my repair work and there is other things wrong that I do not know about the engine comes out and an LS3 goes in. I have always wanted to work with something a little more modern than a nailhead. I have not researched about the bolt pattern on the old Buick engine to see what it is or if there is an adaptor. A dependable engine in a Land Rover sounds good.
 

GL03

Active Member
I am working on 2000 Land Rover with a 240 CI aluminum engine. Is that a Buick motor that has been enlarged from 215 CI? Does rocker arm parts from a 215 interchange with the 240 such as plugs in the ends of the rocker arm shaft? Land Rover parts are hard to find and expensive. Buick parts are easier to get if they will work. If anyone knows anything about this do not be bashful chime in!
LandRover parts can be bought from British Pacific on westcoast or eastcoast British Atlantic. 2000 LandRover rocker shaft assemblys are direct fit into 215, except that the rockers' cups for the pushrods were common to get loose and produce a ticking noise. You could use the Land Rover rocker shafts and fit all your buick rockers. I wouldn't reuse any of the pushrods unless they are absolutely straight and you measured the distance between the lifter and rocker fitted. The length can change if the block has been deck machined before. The difference between the LandRover engines is the build tolerance is tighter. Which you can see in the rear main and the front cover have seals. The buick engine has rope seal due to the tolerance it was designed for in 1963.


Useful information to source parts :
turnerengineering.co.uk

T-liner for resleeving 4.0, 4.6, 3.5, 3.9

Ductile Iron Flange Liner stock and oversized
 

suntreemcanic

Active Member
I pushed the liner back into place and pined all the liners. Hopefully they will not move. I drove it 500 miles around here working out the other bugs. Then I hauled it to California and gave to my son for Xmas last week. So now I will be doing repairs on the phone. I have no confidence in British engineering.
 

suntreemcanic

Active Member
When I got there and unloaded it I took my son for a drive. During the drive the three yellow lights for traction control, down hill decent and something else all came on. I worked on those for two months and spent over $500 on parts. Those three lights are the dregs of Land Rovers. A perfect example of British engineering. Fortunately non of those circuits having a problem effect the actual working of the brakes for street driving. My son drove it into his garage and started working on it. What a Xmas present. I feel bad.
 

GL03

Active Member
that LR is lots of car, many features, something is bound to go wrong. anyways, if you maintain it and fix the issues it good for off roading.
 
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